Athlete performances at Tokyo 2020 Olympics brings BVI in sight of podium – BVIOC seeks investment into elite athletes

The British Virgin Islands was represented by 3 athletes in 2 sports at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games which concluded on August 8 with a closing ceremony at the Olympic Stadium. The small team comprising Kyron McMaster (400m hurdles), Chantel Malone (long jump) and Elinah Phillip (50m freestyle) was the strongest set to represent the territory at any Olympic Games.

Eldred Henry (shot put) was the first athlete to have qualified for Tokyo 2020 but he was forced to pull out due to an injury in his throwing arm.

In a Game of firsts for the territory, McMaster and Malone became the BVI’s first 2 athletes to advance to the finals to compete amongst the world’s best athletes in their events. They each were the first athletes to compete in the hurdles and long jump respectively. McMaster was the first athlete to win his heats and the first to make the top 4 finalists to cross the line with his time of 47.08 – current 4th fastest time and the world’s 8th fastest time ever – in what has been classed as the event’s fastest Olympic race. McMaster and Phillip also set National Records with Phillip’s time of 25.74 marking her as the top Caribbean performer in the 50m Free.

Harrigan-Scott, a three-times Olympian and the first female to represent the BVI at the Olympics in 2008, led the organisation and management of the team at the Games.

Speaking at a wrap up virtual press conference on August 4 after the final competition for the BVI, Ephraim Penn, President of the BVI Olympic Committee congratulated and thanked the athletes, their coaches and National Federations and also acknowledged the efforts of the Chef de Mission and Lloyd Black, Secretary General for the BVIOC, who was the COVID Liaison Officer for the delegation.

Penn went on to explain that the impressive results of the team at the Games was many years in the making that required planning and funding to support the athletes in their training and preparations for the Games. He highlighted that the performances put the athletes as serious podium contenders in upcoming Games and that the opportunity was open to the private sector to support the pathway to get athletes to the finals and ultimately to the podium of the Olympics.

“The athletes have been preparing for these Games for 5 years and are recipients of an Olympic Scholarship which offers financial and technical support so they can train and compete at qualifying meets for the Olympics. In addition, the BVIOC set up an Elite Athlete scholarship which puts money into the hands of the athletes to ease their financial stress so that they can concentrate on preparing for competition. Their successes at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics will make it easier for us to try and solicit more funding from the private sector and bolster the structure we have in place to support them so they can develop to the best of their ability.”

The Chef de Mission, who is responsible for the organisation and logistical management of the delegation as well as the technical aspects of the athletes’ competitions and daily schedules and activities while at the Games, reviewed the athletes’ performances and acknowledged the commitment of their coaches and support of the BVIOC and encouraged a forward movement to help the athletes reach their potential.

“While our athletes may come from a small nation where the resources are more limited than larger countries, they come to compete with the same heart, talent and dedication so if we can figure out a way to level the playing field and really invest in them, you will be surprised at where they can take us because they are at that level and they are exceptionally good.”

Harrigan-Scott wrapped up the experience with a reflection on the organisation of the Games. “It actually was an amazing Games and the organisers, volunteers and Government of Japan did an incredible job under the constraints and concerns of the COVID-19 pandemic. I am glad the Games were not cancelled as the athletes were ready to compete and we have seen some exceptional performances here.”

Dr. the Honourable Natalio D. Wheatley, MHA. Deputy Premier Minister for Education, Culture, Youth Affairs, Fisheries and Agriculture, who was in Japan to witness the finals, congratulated the athletes on their achievements and thanked them and the delegation for their roles in the success of the BVI’s appearance at Tokyo 2020 and to pledge more support for the athletes.

“We now understand what it takes to compete at this level and I will be focused on what we can do to assist more. We know that we have to invest more in sports and be more consistent in our support for our athletes and I will be working on this in consultation with the BVIOC,” said Dr. the Honourable Minister Wheatley.

In addition to the 3 athletes, the Chef de Mission, Ephraim Penn and Lloyd Black the BVI delegation included Team Coach Winston Potter, Coach Lennox Graham (McMaster), Coach Dwight Phillips (Malone), Coach Brien Moffitt (Elinah) and Sofia Fay, BVIOC PRO/Reporter.

The athletes, including Henry who is on the road to recovery, will continue with their training and preparations for upcoming competitions after a short rest and recovery break. A return date to the BVI is not yet confirmed based on their training and competition schedules. Malone and McMaster have sights on competing at the Diamond League events in Europe in August and September respectively.

Kyron McMaster delivers historic performance at Tokyo 2020 Olympic finals

Kyron McMaster of Team British Virgin Islands competes during round one of the Men’s 400m hurdles heats on day seven of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Olympic Stadium on July 30, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Matthias Hangst/Getty Images)

Kyron McMaster wrapped up Team BVI’s performance at the Tokyo Olympic Games on August 3 with an historic 4th place finish in what is classed as the fastest 400m Hurdles race of all time. McMaster’s time of 47.08 sets a new National Record and Personal Best and is ranked as the 5th top fastest times at an Olympics and the 8th all time fastest in the world. He is the first BVI athlete to achieve a top 4 position in an Olympic final.

“Being in the race felt amazing. The plan was to come out and just execute the race as best as possible. I came into this race with a personal best of 47.50 and I chopped off 0.4 off my best and I literally gave it my all,” said McMaster.

4 years ago, 47.08 would have been a World Record or an Olympic Record but with the medal contenders consistently running 47 in their pre-Olympic competitions, the bar was raised for Tokyo 2020. The 3 top spots were won by Karsten Warholm (Norway) who set a new World Record and Olympic Record with a blistering time of 45.94 followed by Benjamin Rai (USA) 46.17 and Alison do Santos (Brazil) for the bronze with a time of 46.72.

“What you saw today was the epitome of greatness with the world’s top 3 hurdlers and I am grateful that my performance was enough to get me in the top four to cross the line,” said McMaster. “These guys are not the average runners anymore and I will be aiming to get to their level.”

McMaster, who was racing after 2 weeks of treatment on his right quad which he tweaked at the Diamond League race in Sweden, was the first male athlete of the territory and second national athlete to advance to an Olympic final. He is also the first athlete to win individual event heats at the Olympics. His time is an OECS, Caribbean and Central American record.

Chantel Malone of Team British Virgin Islands competes in the Women’s Long Jump Final on day eleven of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Olympic Stadium on August 03, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Matthias Hangst/Getty Images)

Chantel Malone, who is the BVI’s first Olympic long jump competitor was the territory’s first athlete to advance to the finals when she jumped a distance of 6.82 in the Qualifier round. She closed out her first Olympic appearance with a mark of 6.50 in her third attempt falling short of her expectations and abilities.

“I am very disappointed with my result,” said Malone. “My intention was to go out there and at least execute and I didn’t. Nonetheless, I am grateful for the experience and being able to compete as a finalist at the Olympics. I am going to do what I need to do in order to stay on my A game and be able to compete and get on the podium.”

Elinah Phillip, the 50m freestyle swimmer, had concluded her second Olympic appearance on July 30 after she set a new National Record and PB with a non-advancing time of 25.74 to place 2nd in her heat of the qualifying round. The result positioned her 34/81 in the 50 Free and identified her as the top female Caribbean athlete in the event.

Kyron McMaster qualifies for the 400m Hurdles finals at Tokyo 2020

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Adding to the exciting action of the day on August 1, Kyron McMaster joined teammate, long jumper Chantel Malone in making history when he won his heat in the 400m hurdles semifinals with a time of 48.26 to automatically qualify for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic event finals.

“I got to the warm-up track ahead of the race and just zoned in and went through the normal routine. Coach Lennox and I had agreed that once I got to the race the plan was solely to run to get into the finals rather than to try and run hard, and we accomplished that goal. Now it’s just to rest and get the body tuned up and get ready for the finals,” said McMaster.

McMaster became the first male athlete of the territory and second national athlete to advance to an Olympic final after Malone’s performance earlier in the day. He is also the first athlete to win individual event heats at the Olympics.

“The goal is not finished just yet,” said McMaster. “We are on the homestretch and it’s just to complete the race by getting on the line and giving my best!”

The BVI delegation, which includes Ephraim Penn, President of the BVI Olympic Committee, Lloyd Black, Secretary General, Tahesia Harrigan-Scott, Chef de Mission, Team Coach Winston Potter and McMaster’s personal Coach Lennox Graham were in the stands to watch the semi-finals.

“While we were not surprised to see Kyron cross the line first, we were no less excited about the result. Kyron is a fighter and there is no way that he would not have done whatever he needed to do to make it into the finals. We are very proud of his success,” said Penn. “To have athletes competing in the finals at an Olympic Games is a plan that has been in the making since the BVIOC’s Quadrennial goals of 2012 and to witness it happening at Tokyo 2020 with 2 of our successful senior track and field athletes who are Olympic Scholarship recipients is very thrilling and we can’t wait to watch their closing performances.”

The 400m hurdles finals takes place on Tuesday, August 3 at 12:20pm JST (11:20pm, Monday, August 2 BVI time) when McMaster will race in lane 4 against the world’s top 3 hurdlers including world record holder Karsten Warholm (Norway), Rai Benjamin (USA) and Alison dos Santos (Brazil).

Dr. the Honourable Natalio D. Wheatley, MHA. Deputy Premier Minister for Education, Culture, Youth Affairs, Fisheries and Agriculture arrived into Japan a day before the finals to witness the historic occasion.

McMaster’s Olympic debut at Tokyo 2020 was preceded with a short but successful season where he set a new National Record and PB when he ran a time of 47.50 at the USA Track and Field Golden Games, Walnut, California in May 2021.

A two-times Diamond League Champion and ranked number 4 by World Athletics, McMaster made major history for the BVI when he won the Territory’s first Commonwealth Games medal when he was 21 years old with a 48.25 first-place finish at the Gold Coast 2018 Games in Australia. He is also set new event records for the Central American and Caribbean (CAC) Games at Barranquilla 2018 and for the North American Central American and Caribbean (NACAC) Championships at Toronto 2018.

Malone, who secured her spot in the long jump finals with an automatic qualifying mark of 6.82m in the Qualifying round, will also compete on Tuesday, August 3 at 10:50am (9:50pm Monday, August 2 BVI time). Elinah Phillip, the 50m freestyle swimmer, wrapped up her 2nd Olympic appearance on July 30 after she set a new National Record and PB with a non-advancing time of 25.74 in her heat of the qualifying round. The result ranks her top female Caribbean athlete in the event.

Chantel Malone advances to long jump finals at Tokyo 2020

Chantel Malone after qualifying for the long jump finals on August 1 at the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic Games

Chantel Malone made history for the British Virgin Islands once more when she qualified for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games long jump finals with a distance of 6.82m achieved on her 3rd attempt at the Tokyo Olympic Stadium on Sunday, August 1.

“I’m excited and happy to be going into the finals with a 6.82- especially as I had to take some time off ahead of the Games to work on recovering from an injury that I sustained at a meet at the beginning of July,” said Malone. “Jumping an 82 was the reassurance I needed and is a testament to my growth as an athlete just because the old me would have folded after the first two bad jumps, but today, I reminded myself that it only takes one and to execute it.”

Malone became the first athlete of the territory to advance to an Olympic final.

“I may be the first athlete to make it to the finals but honestly, that’s always been the goal and to actually be on that podium. The goal is to execute and hopefully we will be good but it’s a tough field out there with a lot of automatic qualifiers, so I just have to bring my A-Game and stay focused.”

Ephraim Penn, President of the BVI Olympic Committee was watching the event from the Olympic Family tribune along with Secretary General Lloyd Black.

“We were so excited when Chantel not only qualified for the finals, but that she managed to hit a distance beyond the automatic qualifying mark of 6.75,” said Penn. “The BVIOC and family of National Federations congratulate Chantel and her coach, Dwight Phillips on this achievement and we are looking forward to Tuesday’s event and to cheering her on in support of the goal for a podium finish.”

Tokyo 2020 is Malone’s first Olympics which she qualified for when she leapt a distance of 7.08 at the Florida International “Pro Addition” International Track Meet, Miramar in March 2021. The mark was a new National Record and a Season and Personal Best for the athlete who is ranked number 8 by World Athletics.

Malone’s history-making flair was demonstrated when she won the BVI’s first PanAm Games medal when she took the gold at Lima 2019 with a leap of 6.68m.

The finals take place on Tuesday, August 3 at 10:50am (9:50pm, Monday, August 2 BVI time).

Kyron McMaster, will compete in the 400m hurdles semi-finals later today after he won his qualifying heat with a time of 48.79 on Friday, July 30. Elinah Phillip, the 50m freestyle swimmer, wrapped up her 2nd Olympic appearance on July 30 after she set a new National Record and PB with a non-advancing time of 25.74 in her heat of the qualifying round. The result ranks her top female Caribbean athlete in the event.

Phillip sets new 50m Freestyle National Record & McMaster advances to 400m Hurdle semi finals at Tokyo 2020

Elinah Phillip, of British Virgin Islands, swims in a women’s 50-meter freestyle heat at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Friday, July 30, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Elinah Phillip set a new National Record and PB when she placed 2nd in her 50m Freestyle Heat with a non-advancing time of 25.74 at the Tokyo Aquatic Center, Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games the evening of July 30, 2021.

The time is an automatic qualifier for the upcoming FINA Worlds and ranks Elinah as the Caribbean’s top female 50m freestyle athlete. It also improves her standing in the inaugural PanAm Junior Games slated to be held at the end of this year.

Earlier in the day, Kyron McMaster made national history when he advanced to the semi-finals in the 400m hurdles at his Olympic debut to become the first male athlete to compete in an Olympic semi and the only athlete to win an individual event heat. He joins Tahesia Harrigan-Scott, Chef de Mission for Tokyo 2020, to become the 2nd athlete to compete in a semi-final event at an Olympic Games. Kyron will race in Heat 3 Lane 7 on August 1.

Competing in her second Olympics, Elinah – who was also the flag bearer at the Opening Ceremony – was very excited and proud of the result which positions her 34th out of 81 competitors.

“It’s a big day for me – I finished my pre dentistry summer program at Columbia University College of Dental Medicine and came and set a new National Record and PB at the Olympics,” said the 21-year old swimmer. “I’m feeling a bit overwhelmed because this achievement means so much to me personally after a very turbulent 2020. I am very grateful for all the support that I have received from my family, the BVI Olympic Committee, FIU, my swim coach Brien Moffitt and my teammates and everyone back home. I can’t express how much it means to me.”

Watching from the Olympic Family tribune were President of the BVIOC Ephraim Penn, Secretary General Lloyd Black and Chef de Mission Tahesia Harrigan-Scott.

“Elinah’s performance this evening has impressed us all and made us incredibly proud,” said Penn. “On behalf of the BVIOC and our member federations, I congratulate Elinah on her achievement and thank her for giving 110% and doing us proud. I also would like to recognize her coach, Brien Moffitt who has demonstrated a sound appreciation for Elinah’s potential and who, in just a few months, has helped her to achieve great results and outperform herself every time.”

A swim coach at FIU, Coach Moffitt was responsible for recruiting the 21-year old to the University as part of its longterm commitment to developing a strong swimming team.

“I am so very proud of Elinah’s accomplishment today and, to be able to be at her best at the biggest sporting stage that there is, is something that shows her resilience and mental fortitude,” said Coach Moffitt. ”When you look at the path and journey she has taken to get to this point it’s very remarkable. We’re grateful and happy with what the results today but we will be coming back to work after a short and plan to aim higher and dream bigger.”

Elinah is the BVI’s leading national swimmer, holding records in the 50, 100, and 200m freestyle and the 50m butterfly. She made her Olympic debut at Rio 2016. She is the first swimmer and the youngest athlete to represent the BVI at an Olympic Games.

Ranked number 8 in her event by World Athletics, Chantel Malone will make her Olympic debut when she competes in the Tokyo 2020 long jump Qualification round on August 1.

BVI showcases colours of the BVI at Tokyo 2020 Opening Ceremony

Flag bearers Elinah Phillip (50m freestyle) Kyron McMaster (400m hurdler) and Tahesia Harrigan-Scott, Chef de Mission.represented the British Virgin Islands at the Opening Ceremony to mark the start of the long-awaited Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games on July 23, 2021

A delegation of three represented the British Virgin Islands at the Opening Ceremony to mark the start of the long-awaited Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games on July 23, 2021. Elinah Phillip, the 50m freestyle swimmer was the flag bearer and led ahead of Kyron McMaster (400m hurdler) and Tahesia Harrigan-Scott, Chef de Mission.

“This has been a long wait with many challenges but we all are finally here. it is exciting. Our athletes are prepared and focused, the energy levels are up and we are ready to go!” said Harrigan-Scott.

Phillip and McMaster in turn described their emotional state as being excited and euphoric and were looking forward to getting inside the Olympic Stadium to experience the atmosphere and to see the venue ahead of the competitions.

Chantel Malone (long jump) who completes the team of 3 for the 32nd Olympiad, landed in Tokyo in the late afternoon of July 23 along with the rest of the BVI’s delegation to include Ephraim Penn, President of the BVIOC, Lloyd Black, Secretary General and Winston Potter, Team Coach. Swimming coach Brien Moffitt arrived with Phillip on July 18.

“While I was unable to attend the Opening Ceremony in person due to travel delays, I was able to watch our delegation walk into the Olympic Stadium with the flag held high and proud,” said Penn. “These are unusual times and we are entering a new era of Olympic Games. We have a special team that has the full support of the BVIOC and our nation and we are definitely looking forward to their competitions next week.”

The 28th nation to march into the Olympic Stadium, the 3 representatives wore outfits designed by Rhenique Cooper and Ruth Frazer of the BVI and which incorporated the Territory’s colours and traditional dress in a modern design.

“The inspiration behind this design was our original BVI traditional dress. I wanted to take elements of the puff sleeves and the big skirt and modernize it into a dress that a BVIslander of today could wear. Thus, making the skirt tiered and shorter gave it the same effect of being full without feeling weighed down. This is will be my first time designing for the BVI Olympic Committee and I’m very excited. I’m grateful to have this opportunity and it feels very surreal,” said Cooper.

Kristin Frazer, who designed the mask, project managed the production of the Opening Ceremony wear. The men’s button-down shirt and jacket were designed by her mother, Ruth Frazer.

The Opening Ceremony typically is a high demand event where the host nation presents an exceptional performance choreographed to showcase its history, culture, and innovation and to tell a story that reflects its values and that of its Olympic legacy. For Tokyo 2020, the occasion was more subdued than usual with COVID-19 protocol restrictions limiting attendance. Observing the continuous message for delivering a “safe games”, the athlete delegations representing the 206 participating nations marching into the stadium were also smaller in number than in previous editions. There were approximately 6,000 athletes and team officials, 900 Games stakeholders and guests of honour and 3,500 broadcasters and press.

At 11:15pm (JST) His Majesty the Emperor of Japan declared the Games of Tokyo, celebrating the XXXII Olympiad of the modern era open. The Games will proceed with the new Olympic motto of “Faster, Higher, Stronger – Together” announced by the IOC on July 20.

A total of 11,091 athletes are expected to compete in 33 sports and 339 events at the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic Games. The BVI’s athletes will compete in 2 sports and 3 events with the following dates and times (adjusted for the BVI) for each of their first round of competitions: McMaster, 400m hurdles heat 1 – 9:55 pm, Thursday, July 29; Elinah Phillip, 50m freestyle heats – 6:00 am, Friday, July 30; Malone long jump qualifying round – 8:50pm, Saturday, July 31. This will be the first Olympics for McMaster and Malone and the second for Phillip who made her Olympic debut at Rio 2016 in Brazil at 16 years of age. She was the BVI’s youngest athlete and first swimmer to compete at an Olympic Games.

The Olympic Games will be broadcast live on NBC with daily team reports and updates from the BVIOC on its social media platforms on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and by Dean Greenaway on ZROD 103.7 and CBN 90.9FM.

BVIOC Presents Team for Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic Games

Team IVB for Tokyo 2020

The Virgin Islands (UK) Team for the rescheduled Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic Games is today confirmed by the BVI Olympic Committee and Chef de Mission, Mrs. Tahesia Harrigan-Scott to include two track and field athletes and one swimmer. Kyron McMaster will compete in the men’s 400m hurdles and Chantel Malone will compete in the women’s long jump. Swimmer Elinah Phillip will compete in the women’s 50m freestyle. The Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games take place in Japan July 23 – August 8, 2021.

McMaster and Phillip will be the flag bearers at the Opening Ceremony on July 23. The athletes will be in clothing and masks respectively designed by Virgin Islanders Ms. Rhenique Cooper and Ms. Kristin Fraser.

This will be the first Olympic Games for McMaster and Malone while Phillip made her Olympic debut at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in Brazil where she was the VI’s youngest athlete and the first to represent the Territory in aquatics at any Olympics.

While Olympian Eldred Henry had an automatic qualification to compete in the shot put at Tokyo 2020, ongoing recovery from an injury in his throwing arm resulted in the decision to step down from the team.

“I am proud to present our athletes for Tokyo 2020,” said Chef Harrigan-Scott, a three times Olympian in the 100m sprint. “Even though COVID-19 has drastically changed the dynamics of the Olympic Games, it did not waiver the determination or drive of our brilliant athletes. They have prepared vigorously to represent the Virgin Islands in their respective events coming up in the next few weeks and, after communicating with each of the athletes and watching their preparatory competitions leading up to Tokyo 2020, I am confident that they will make these Virgin Islands proud.”

Since the COVID-19 pandemic forced the Tokyo 2020 Games to be rescheduled by one year to take place in the summer of 2021, the IOC, Tokyo 2020 Organisers and the Government of Japan have issued stringent protocols set out in regularly updated Playbooks to ensure the health and safety of all athletes, personnel, delegates, media and the people of Japan. The strict measures for the VI delegation are overseen by appointed COVID Liaison Officers (CLOs) BVIOC Secretary General Mr. Lloyd Black and Chef Harrigan-Scott.

The Chef de Mission highlighted how the response to the pandemic has differentiated Tokyo 2020 from previous Olympic Games. Precautions include restrictive movement of the delegation, strict COVID-19 counter measures which include daily temperature and COVID-19 testing, the inability to attend other sporting events, limited-to-no guest allowance in the Olympic Village, the lack of spectators from foreign countries, no site seeing by the delegation and every movement in Tokyo and Japan needing to be pre-approved by the Japanese Government.

“The Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games probably are one of the most anticipated Games in sports,” said Mr. Penn. “The continuing changes brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic have been quite a challenge and on behalf of the BVIOC, I highly commend all our athletes and Chef de Mission for their focus, determination and tireless efforts which have resulted in thorough preparation and impressive performances with new national records set in all three disciplines by Chantel, Kyron and Elinah in the lead up to the Tokyo 2020 Games. We are sad that Eldred will not be joining the team in person but intend to include him in our reports from Tokyo 2020. We are extremely proud of all our athletes have achieved thus far and will be in Japan to give our support and to watch them perform at the 32nd Olympiad.”

The delegation to Tokyo will include BVIOC President Mr. Ephraim Penn, Secretary General Mr. Lloyd Black, athlete coaches Mr. Lennox Graham (McMaster), Mr. Dwight Phillipe (Malone), Mr. Brien Moffitt (Phillip) and Mr. Winston Potter (team coach). Dr. The Honourable Natalio D. Wheatley MHA, Deputy Premier, Minister for Education, Culture, Youth Affairs, Fisheries and Agriculture is also slated to attend the Games pending travel restrictions.

“I want to congratulate these hardworking individuals for this momentous achievement. It is even more exciting knowing that we have athletes, through their hard work, who are poised to compete for medal and I plan to be there to cheer them along waving our Virgin Islands flag. I wish all our athletes well; we are extremely proud of you!” said the Dr. The Honourable Minister Wheatley.

Daily updates will be posted on the BVIOC social media platforms on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and reports will be disseminated to media from the BVIOC PRO, Sofia Fay, Broadsword Communications, who will be in Tokyo to cover the VI’s athletes.

BVIFA concludes first online Academy Coaches’ Certificate course

26 participants attended the BVI Football Association Coaches Education Department’s first online course

The BVI Football Association Coaches Education Department has just concluded its first online course – the Academy Coaches’ Certificate – with 26 participants successfully completing the four-module workshop.

A broad spectrum of new coaches took part in the Academy Course representing clubs such as Panthers FC, Islanders FC, Old Madrid FC, Wolues FC, Sugar Boys FC and Rebels FC as well as players from the National teams and experienced coaches looking to extend their knowledge with new ideas and discussion with the course facilitator, Jason Blake.

Blake who specializes in Talent Identification and Development and who has worked at English Premier League Clubs of Southampton, Burnley, and Bournemouth as well as the Canadian Football Association, put together the course content along with BVIFA Technical Director, Dan Neville.

Modules convered by the course included Managing a Match day, Talent ID, Long Term Player Development and
Session Planning.

Blakd and Neville were pleased with the way the course went.

“We are delighted to get our online coach education underway with our first Academy Coaches’ Certificate. Educating coaches on the islands and beyond is a priority for us and we feel the blend of online and live sessions run in conjunction with the H Lavity Stoutt Community College will have a great impact on the knowledge and performance of coaches from all sports.”

A ”live” education session for coaches on how to build a player’s technical base and which also was concluded recently on Tortola and Virgin Gorda with 18 coaches attending, is seen by Neville as a key component of the BVIFA’s overall development plan for football.

Sugar Boys win on penalties against Lion Heart in game one of the Super 6 best of three Final

Sugar Boys 5-4 win on penalties against Lion Heart in game one of the Super 6 best of three Final.

Sugar Boys FC staged a late comeback and then held their nerve to win a penalty shootout 5-4 against Lion Heart FC in game one of the Super 6 Final on Sunday.

The game, played in front of a vociferous crowd at the Virgin Gorda Recreation Ground, looked for all money to be going the way of Lion Heart as they led 3-1 with just over 15 minutes left of regulation time. However, the Sugar Boys have a never say die attitude especially on their “home” pitch, and staged a remarkable comeback, as first talisman Derol Redhead made it 3-2 in the 81st minute and then, deep into added time, McGraw Baptiste calmly stepped up to level the game at 3-3 from the penalty spot.

Lion Heart played a hard game and had thoroughly deserved their lead, not only making sure the final series got off to a great start but also making sure the fans got their money’s worth. It was an intense game with Lion Heart taking full advantage of the chances they created, but wilting under some desperate attacking pressure from the Sugar Boys.

Earlier, Dwayne Smith had put Lion Heart ahead in the 36th minute before German Gonzalez equalized in the 38th minute. Smith scored from the penalty spot in the 62nd minute to make it 2-1 and Nicarious Watt seemingly put his team well on the way to a big win in the 74th minute, to make it 3-1, before the drama unfolded.

With the momentum firmly in their favour, each Sugar Boy stepped up to score his penalty, whilst Lindon Wiliams served notice of his intent by getting his hands on a couple of Lion Heart efforts before making the all important save at the death to hand Sugar Boys the early advantage in the best of three series going into next Sunday’s Game 2 at the East End / Long Look venue on Tortola.

Meanwhile in the Women’s League

Laverne Fahie threading her way goal wards for Avengers v Wolues

Avengers FC further stamped their championship credentials on proceedings with a hard fought 1-0 victory over Wolues FC Women after Laverne Fahie scored the only goal of the game in the 10th minute.

Coach Gloria Fahie had pulled off a master stroke as she decided to push “Ebony” higher up the pitch and saw her confidence rewarded in quick fashion. “After that goal,” said Fahie, ”we played a compact defensive game and denied the Wolues many goal scoring opportunities. They had their usual quick passing tactic, but even if they did create something they found no way past Makeda (Fahie) or “Shay-Shay (Vanterpool) in defense nor the agility and skills of our goalkeeper, Britney Peters.”

Community engages in sports at inaugural BVI Beach Games

A cross section of the Virgin Islands’ community attended the inaugural BVI Beach Games which was hosted by the BVI Olympic Committee and four national federations at Brandywine Bay beach on June 27, 2021.

In keeping with the tag line, “Unity through Sports”, residents of all ages and abilities took advantage of the opportunity to try the free sporting activities presented by rugby, volleyball, football and sailing and joined in a pick-up game or registered a team to take part in mini tournaments.

“The feedback from all involved with organising this first BVI Beach Games is positive,” said Ephraim Penn, President of the BVI Olympic Committee. “While we had hoped that more people would have joined in, we understand that many had changed their plans to come to the beach when they woke up to rain showers in the early morning. Overall, we’re pleased with the event and feel it was a success with a good uptake of the sports that were on offer.”

“This is such a great day! We were a bit put off by yesterday’s rain but so glad that we decided to come out and bring the kids to have fun at the beach. We’re really enjoying the whole thing, including the food!” said one participant attending with her husband and two children.

The BVIOC’s primary mission in facilitating the games is to stimulate the community’s interest in engaging in sports and getting physically active but the ultimate goal is sports development and to foster interest and growth in the disciplines that are played as a competitive beach sports at regional and international level.

“Rugby has already sent national teams to compete in Florida and elsewhere. As the other national federations see an increase in interest from their members in playing competitively in the beach version of their sport, there’s potential to develop national teams that could then play against our neighbours from the USVI, St Maarten and Puerto Rico who would be invited to join in the winter 2022 edition,” said Penn. “The mid-term target is to host the first Regional Beach Games possibly in the winter of 2023 as a sports tourism product provided the COVID-19 travel protocols make it viable.”

The BVI Beach Games included music by DJ Cuffy, fundraising cash bars run by the federations for rugby, volleyball and football, food for sale by Brandywine Estate and ice cream by Icy Treats. Recycling of disposables was managed by Green & Clean VI Ltd. A collection table for the donation of non-perishable items for the Family Support Network was also set up as a charitable community out-reach element.

The June edition was made possible through collaboration between the BVIOC and volunteers of the 4 national federations and was sponsored and supported by ZBVI Radio, Nagico Insurance Ltd, Roadtown Wholesale Ltd distributors of Coca Cola products Dasani water and Powerade, VISAR, Public Works Department and Solid Waste Department.

The beach games took place the weekend after the traditional symbolic Olympic Day run, walk and cycle events held on Tortola, Virgin Gorda and Jost Van Dyke on Saturday, June 19.

More photos of the event can be viewed on the BVIOC page on FaceBook