Team BVI Challenged at Pan Pepin Regatta

By Royal BVI Yacht Club

Jerome Parkins finishing third in the Laser Radial Class in the 2017 Pan Pepin Regatta, Puerto Rico. Photo: Provided

Jerome Parkins finishing third in the Laser Radial Class in the 2017 Pan Pepin Regatta, Puerto Rico. Photo: Provided

Ten Team BVI sailors raced in the 2017 Pan Pepin Regatta hosted by Club Nautico San Juan this past weekend.

Over 90 boats competed in the regatta in the Laser Radial, Laser 4.7, 420, Sunfish, Optimist Green Fleet and Optimist Championship Fleet.

The BVI Team was represented in the Optimist Championship, Optimist Green and Laser Radial fleets and were joined by three additional sailors from the US, St. Croix and Curacao. Darius Berenos from Curacao sailed with Team BVI in the Laser 4.7 class along with Milo Miller and Zach Carvahal competing in the Optimist Championship Fleet from St. Croix and the US respectively.

Winds were medium to heavy with speeds from 13-20 knots and the San Juan harbor was challenging to track the wind shifts but everyone worked hard to master the conditions. Unfortunately for a number of the team, problems with gear failure forced them to sit out some races and count some painful letter scores.

Top BVI Sailors included Kael Chalwell placing sixth in the Optimist Green Fleet, Nathan Haycraft placing fifth in the Optimist Championship Fleet and Jerome Parkins finishing third in the Laser Radial Class.

Darius Berenos finished first in the Laser 4.7 class after a dramatic winner takes all final race in which he beat St. Thomas’ Mateo Di Blasi to win the tie break.

Results
Opti Championships (30)
5. Nathan Haycraft (1st blue fleet)
18. Ryan Lettsome (3rd white fleet)
29. Samuel Allen (7th white fleet)

Opti Green (24)
6. Kael Chalwell
19. Amanda Plaxton
23. Victoria Rowlette

Laser Radial (6)
3. Jerome Parkins
4. Alex Rambarose
5. Stephon Ganga
6. Noah George

Click for full results

Behind the Scenes at Rio 2016 with Eldred Henry

Eldred Henry during training at Rio 2016. Photo: BIVOC

Eldred Henry during training at Rio 2016. Photo: BIVOC

It’s was a cold and drizzly day in Rio but the training must go on for 21-year old Eldred Henry, BVI’s first shot putter to go to the Olympics. His event takes place at the Olympic Stadium in the morning of Thursday, August 18 at 9.55am BST (8.55am EST).

Soaking up the experience of being at his first Olympic Games, Eldred has been training twice a day, every day since the Rio 2016 Opening Ceremony on August 5.

The morning session is usually muscle work in the gym where the concentration is on power. The afternoons are committed to throwing.

Eldred gets on the bus departing for the Air Force Club from the Athletes’ Village. On this particular day, he’s in the company of some of the other throwers training under the watch of Eldred’s mentor, Tennessee coach, John Newell. The chat on the 30-minute journey is all about the field sport of throwing.

Once at the training base, Eldred exchanges his accreditation card for a couple of shot puts and makes his way to the ring with Nigerian thrower, Stephen Mozia, ranked third in the world.

Eldred Henry dusting with chalk prior to the throw at training at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

Eldred Henry dusting with chalk prior to the throw at training at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

“Most of the days I haven’t had any other throwers around so it’s actually quite good to observe them, especially if they are using a technique that my coach has been training me to use.”

Eldred’s coach, Omar Jones arrived into Rio a few days after Eldred during which time the 6’5” athlete maintained his training schedule with BVIAA Head Coach, Winston Potter.

“I have improved quite a lot since the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games, primarily because I switched from gliding to rotating when I started training at Arizona Central College,” he explains. “While training here in Rio, I had been sending clips of my throws to Coach Omar so that he can review them and let me know where I need to focus. It’s good to have him here though because he can help me make any adjustments in real time and help me get into my rhythm.”

In the run up to competitions, Eldred prepares body and mind for peak performance. This includes cutting out sugars and sweet foods so as not to slow down his muscles and trying to adapt to a sleeping and waking pattern to suit his competition hours.

Eldred strapping up his wrist prior to a throw. Photo: BVIOC

Eldred strapping up his wrist prior to a throw. Photo: BVIOC

“Trying to get enough sleep has been a bit of a challenge for me because my timetable in the BVI is different, but I should be okay,” he says.

On his mind set for competition day, Eldred says that he learned a lot from Glasgow 2014, including what to expect once he enters the arena. “I need to stay level headed and calm. My Personal Best is a 20 meter throw which actually was a safety throw and my Season Best was 19.39 in Tucson in May this year so I feel that if I can stay relaxed and focused, I can get out there and try and do even better.”

Coach Omar Jones with Eldred Henry at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

Coach Omar Jones with Eldred Henry at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

Behind the Scenes at Rio 2016 with Ashley Kelly

Ashley Kelly in team wear at Rio 2016 Photo: BVIOC

Ashley Kelly in team wear at Rio 2016 Photo: BVIOC

After the whirlwind of excitement of leading Team BVI as the British Virgin Islands’ Flag Bearer into the Maracana Stadium at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games Opening Ceremony, Ashley Kelly switched into full training mode for the upcoming Women’s 200m heats which kick off at 8.35am on Monday, August 15.

Waking up bright and early on day 6 of the Olympics, Ashley grabs a bowl of cereal and makes her way to the Athletes’ Transport hub with Head Athletics Coach Winston Potter and personal coach, Pete Charles. Plugging in to some tunes, Ashley takes the opportunity to focus on the morning ahead during the 20-minute bus ride.

The sun is out and it’s a moderately cool and temperate day in Rio. The Navy Base Club, one of the three athletic training grounds for Rio 2016, is active with athletes from all over the world clustered in small groups on the track field. The trio that make up Ashley’s group find a spot under the tent and discuss the set of exercises that Ashley will do that morning.

“I don’t normally get a say in what my training schedule looks like,” says Ashley. “I can tell Coach if my body is particularly
hurting but otherwise, it’s his decision on what I will be doing that day.”

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Ashley Kelly training at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

Ashley begins her session with stretches and limb warm ups. “I’m not doing any starts today,” she explains. “It’s a light training day so I’ll do a couple of short sprints and finish with one hard 200m sprint.”

The following day being a rest day means that Ashley will go back and have a session with the Team BVI physiotherapist, Matt McGrath. “I don’t tend to have treatment if I’m training the next day because Matt’s work goes deep into my muscle and it takes a while for the soreness to dissipate.”

Matt agrees, explaining that the physical response to the targeted treatment varies from individual to individual.

Ashley Kelly with Head Athletic Coach Winston Potter and personal coach, Pete Charles. Photo: BVIOC

Ashley Kelly with Head Athletic Coach Winston Potter and personal coach, Pete Charles. Photo: BVIOC

Ashley had incorporated some light gym work in her training regime at the start of the week just to warm up her muscles. “At this point, it’s not about building or strengthening muscles and Tuesday was my last day at the gym. The hard work has been done and now it’s about keeping in optimal condition for competition.”

There is a lot of support for each other in the three apartments shared by the Team BVI delegation of athletes, coaches, physiotherapist and Chef de Mission at Olympic Village. Everyone is on a different schedule but there is constant communication between them through social media chats to make sure that everyone is kept up to date with information, plans (and jokes).

There are dining options in the Village but as a person who likes her fresh fruits, Ashley keeps a stock to hand along with healthy snacks that she tucks into as she feels like.

Ashley Kelly in training at at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

Ashley Kelly in training at at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

“I’ve met up with some of my peers from Illinois and other track meets and I’ve had the opportunity to watch some fencing and basketball,” says Ashley of her extra curricular time at her first Olympic Games. “Those are the two sports I was particularly keen to see at this level and that’s enough for now. My end game is why I’m here and that’s what I’m focused on.”

Behind the Scenes at Rio 2016 with Tahesia Harrigan-Scott

Tahesia Harrigan-Scott taking stock of the track. Photo: BVIOC

Tahesia Harrigan-Scott taking stock of the track. Photo: BVIOC

Tahesia Harrigan-Scott is looking relaxed as the veteran Olympian of the British Virgin Islands’ team of four competing at the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games. She is on her way to the Maracana training ground, adjacent to the stadium where she will be competing on August 12.

Rio 2016 is Tahesia’s third Olympic Games and where she will run the 100m.

It’s an evening training session and the track is active with athletes from all nations, including Grenada’s 400m Gold medalist, Kirani James, running drills.

Tahesia sips her pre-work out drink before she starts her routine of waking up her muscles with stretching exercises.

“Tonight I’ll be keeping it light with some starts, block work, and sprints,” she says. “So I’ll be taking off from the blocks for 10 and 20 meters and also do a couple of 100m and 110m sprints.”

Tahesia Harrigan-Scott concentrates on the task ahead. Photo: BVIOC

Tahesia Harrigan-Scott concentrates on the task ahead. Photo: BVIOC

She moves on to the track where she joins her training partners representing Haiti, Cayman, and Nigeria. Under the observant eye of coach and husband, Joey Scott, Tahesia goes through her sets of leg work – a series of fast, high-knee hops, skips and strides – which will fire up her muscles and trigger limb-placement memory for optimal results.

“At this point all the work is done,” says Coach Scott. “There’s nothing I can say to her or tell her now that’s going to have an impact. It’s all up to her and what we do at competition training is just fine tuning.”

The banter on the track is light and friendly but concentration on the tasks at hand is unwavering.

Tahesia Harrigan-Scott measuring up the blocks. Photo: BVIOC

Tahesia Harrigan-Scott measuring up the blocks. Photo: BVIOC

After measuring distance and adjusting the blocks to suit her leg position, Tahesia executes an impressive backward lunge to land both her feet precisely on the blocks. Lined up against fellow sprinters from elsewhere, Tahesia waits for the start signal before she explodes off the start, keeping up with the four men in the lanes next to her.

Her performance that session wins the nod of approval from Coach Scott. It’s time for a post work out treatment with Team BVI’s physiotherapist, Matt McGrath.

Tahesia Harrigan-Scott at Maracana training grounds, Rio. Photo: BVIOC

Tahesia Harrigan-Scott at Maracana training grounds, Rio. Photo: BVIOC

“I’m feeling good,” says Tahesia as she comes off her last, fast sprint. “This is the first Games where I can say I don’t have any niggling worries, for example an injury that I might not have mentally shaken off. Everything seems aligned for me and I feel well balanced in body, soul and mind to give this my best shot.”

(l-r) at the Rio 2016 Maracana training grounds with Coach Joey Scott, Chris Huffins, former USA decathlete and bronze medalist, Sydney 2000, Tahesia Harrigan-Scott, Kirani James, 400m Gold medalist London 2012, Coach Harvey Glance, 4x100m Gold medalist Montreal 1976.

(l-r) at the Rio 2016 Maracana training grounds with Coach Joey Scott, Chris Huffins, former USA decathlete and bronze medalist, Sydney 2000, Tahesia Harrigan-Scott, Kirani James, 400m Gold medalist London 2012, Coach Harvey Glance, 4x100m Gold medalist Montreal 1976. Photo: BVIOC

Behind the scenes at Rio 2016 with Elinah Phillip

Elinah Phillip. Photo: BVIOC

Elinah Phillip. Photo: BVIOC

Monday was a busy day for Elinah Phiilip, the BVI’s first swimmer in any Olympic Games. With four days to go before competition day, the 16-year old conducted a successful interview in the ESPN studios at the International Broadcasting Center before she headed out to one of the training pools for her midday session with her coach, Benoit Grattepanche.

The venue was busy with swimmers either getting ready for a race that day or working through their competition training routine.  Starting off with warm up exercises pool side, Elinah found a lane and plunged into the water for a couple of laps to loosen her limbs.

Elinah, a year 11 student of Bishops Stortford College and a member of Bishops Stortford Swim Club, alternated her routine from swimming with training aids and resistance bands, to concentrating on form and a few pacing laps.

Elinah Phillip and coach Benoit Grattepanche at the training pool at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

Elinah Phillip and coach Benoit Grattepanche at the training pool at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

Benoit, a French national, is a former competitive swimmer who uses the same training methods he had been coached with to coach Elinah. “It’s a proven method and Elinah has improved on her time since we switched her training regime, on average, shaving off 1 second of her previous performance in the 50m.”

Elinah Phillip training at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

Elinah Phillip training at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

The training programme is based on daily goals which are set on results generated by a swim app created by Benoit to help analyse form, style and speed. The carefully planned schedule of exercises will be rolled out over the next few days until competition time on the morning of Friday, August 12.

Elinah will be swimming in Heat 6  – an indication that she has moved up in the ranks. Her performance times set her in the middle range of speed for all the competitors in her category.

In her last pace lap, Elinah puts in a strong performance that pleases both coach and swimmer. After a couple of cool down laps, Elinah exits the water for her post-training session with Team BVI’s physiotherapist, Matt McGrath.

Elinah Phillip at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

Elinah Phillip with Team BVI physio, Matt McGrath at Rio 2016. Photo: BVIOC

“I feel good,” said Elinah. “I felt strong and comfortable in the last pace lap I did and I’m happy with how this afternoon’s session went. I won’t sleep when I get back because that interferes with my ability to fall asleep at night but I’m going to relax before this evening’s training.”

After three hours of rest, Elinah will return to the training pool where Benoit will be expecting her to put in some hard work before she gets back to Olympic Village for a good night’s sleep.

Elinah Phillip with physio, Matt McGrath and coach Benoit Grattepanche. Photo: BVIOC

Elinah Phillip with physio, Matt McGrath and coach Benoit Grattepanche. Photo: BVIOC

Mom, Tracy Bradshaw is at Rio 2016 as Elinah’s chaperone and recalls the story of a four-year old Elinah who, when learning to swim with Kids And the Sea (KATS), would cling to the side wall and refuse to let go telling the instructor that she was “only small and the pool is too deep” for her to stand up in. It would take another year  (and a little reverse psychology) before Elinah finally let go of her fear to end up swimming her way to the Olympics.

Rio 2016 Team BVI in the count down to competition days

Team BVI at Rio2016 Opening Ceremony 1

Team BVI ready for the Rio 2016 Opening Ceremony (l-r): Benoit Grattepanche, Swimming Coach; Ashley Kelly, (200m) Flag bearer; Elinah Phillip (50m Freestyle); Eldred Henry (Shot Put) Tracy Bradshaw, Swimming Chaperone; Tahesia Harrigan-Scott (100m); Stephanie Russ Penn, Chef de Mission; Winston Potter, Athletics Head Coach.

The day after the Rio 2016 Opening Ceremony, the four members of the British Virgin Islands team took time to recover from an exciting and late night and started the training count down to their first competition dates.

This is the third consecutive Olympiad for 100m sprinter, Tahesia Harrigan-Scott, and the first Olympic Games for 200m runner, Ashley Kelly, shot putter, Eldred Henry and 16-year old swimmer, Elinah Phillip.

Athletics head coach, Winston Potter, swimming coach, Benoit Grattepanche, and physiotherapist, Matt McGrath have the athletes’ daily training, physiotherapy and rest schedules in place. All four athletes are on programmes designed to prepare their muscles for peak performance on action day.

BVI's Ashley Kelly in training at Rio 2016

BVI’s 200m runner, Ashley Kelly in training at Rio 2016

“Sunday was my last day in the weight room,” said Ashley. “I worked on power stuff – light and fast – before hitting the track. All the work is done so I am just working on firing up my muscles and getting sharp.”

Settled in three adjacent apartments in the Olympic Village, the delegation of athletes, coaches, physiotherapist and doctor – under the guardianship of Chef de Mission, Stephanie Russ Penn – have created a relaxed and comfortable atmosphere which is critical for the athletes’ mental and emotional preparation for the competitions.

Reflecting on the Opening Ceremony held on August 5, the athletes agreed that the experience was unique, with Tahesia stating that the enthusiasm and warmth of the crowd was a stand out for her.

Ashley had the honour of leading the team as the flag bearer, entering the Maracana Stadium as the 203rd country out of 207.

The outfits worn by the team reflected the green, white, and gold of the territory’s official colors. It included a white dress and green cardigan for the ladies and white jacket and pants for the men – both outfits accented with a blue scarf imprinted with the green, white, and gold Vigilate.

“We worked with Kristin Frazer of Trefle Designs who was a key person in conceptualizing the ensemble,” said Stephanie. “She was the designer of the dresses and jacket while the team at Quami’s Sewing design Ltd. assisted in the production of the tailor made outfits. Everyone was excited to be part of this and the BVIOC extends sincere thanks for their support.”

Live coverage of all Olympic events in which the territory’s athletes are competing, along with live coverage of the Caribbean’s athletes, will be broadcast on CBN Television Channel 51 and on CBN Radio 90.9FM. Events take place from 8.00am until 2.00pm EST and in the evenings from 7.00pm until 11.00pm EST. Rey O’Neal will be in the studio for live commentary and analysis of the VI’s athletes during their events.

The VI’s athletes’ first round of events are scheduled to take place on August 12 with Tahesia Harrigan-Scott in the Women’s 100m Preliminary Round / Round 1. The Women’s 100m semi finals and final will take place on August 13.

Also on August 12, Elinah Phillip will compete in the Women’s 50m Freestyle Heats with the semi finals taking place later that day. The final for the 50m Freestyle takes place on August 13.

On August 15 Ashley Kelly will compete in Round 1 of the 200M. The semi finals will take place on August 16 and the final on August 17.

On August 18, Eldred Henry will be throwing the Shot Put.

Updates on the VI’s athletes at Rio 2016 will be posted on the BVIOC accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram and can be found on these platforms under BVI Olympic Committee.

Supporters are encourage to use the hashtag handle #teambvi.

Live broadcast of VI’s four athletes competing in Rio 2016 Olympics

Rio 2016 #TeamBVI - Live action on CBN Channel 51

Rio 2016 #TeamBVI – Live action on CBN Channel 51

Four athletes will represent the Virgin Islands at the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games which take place in Brazil from August 5 – 21. The BVI Olympic Committee confirmed that the VI’s qualified track runners, Tahesia Harrigan-Scott (100m) and Ashley Kelly (200m) will be joined by young swimmer, Elinah Phillip (50m Freestyle) and field athlete, Eldred Henry (Shot Put) competing through the universality invitation.

CANOC Broadcasting Inc (CBI) acquired the broadcast rights for the Rio 2016 Olympics and the local scheduling of live broadcasts of events in which Caribbean national athletes will compete. Events take place from 8.00am until 2.00pm and in the evenings from 7.00pm until 11.00pm.

The broadcast on ESPN Caribbean will cover all Olympic events including the Opening and Closing Ceremonies but will focus on Caribbean sports as well as interviews of Caribbean athletes prior to the events. The live coverage can be seen on CBN Television Channel 51 and listened to on the radio by tuning into CBN Radio 90.9FM.

Furthermore, the BVI Olympic Committee has invested in a decoder to be used by CBN to ensure that fans in the VI can follow the live broadcast of all the events in which the VI’s athletes will be competing.

The first rounds for these events are scheduled to take place on August 12 with Tahesia Harrigan-Scott in the Women’s 100m Preliminary Round / Round 1. The Women’s 100m semi finals and final will take place on August 13. Also on August 12, Elinah Phillip will compete in the Women’s 50m Freestyle Heats with the semi finals taking place later that day. The final for the 50m Freestyle takes place on August 13.

On August 15 Ashley Kelly will compete in Round 1 of the 200M. The semi finals will take place on August 16 and the final on August 17. On August 18, Eldred Henry will be throwing the Shot Put.

Mr. Rey O’Neal will be in the studio during the competitions with commentary and analysis of athlete performances.

“This will be the first time that we will have live broadcasting of our athletes in competition at the Olympic Games,” said Ephraim Penn, President of the BVIOC. “We invested in the decoder because we really want viewers and supporters to be able to watch the action for which our athletes have trained so hard. The Olympic Games are the pinnacle and goal of every athlete and it is no mean feat to have gained a spot in this global event. There are flexible, affordable advertising opportunities during the Olympic Games broadcasts on CBN Channel 51 and any interested persons should contact the BVIOC on (284) 494 6920 or by email at cmfarrington@bviolympics.org.”

CBN will also be broadcasting the semi finals and finals for the VI’s other national federation sports of Archery, Basketball, Cycling, Football, Rugby, Tennis, Taekwondo, and Volleyball. FLOW customers will also be able to watch alternative live feeds through the FLOW ID app.

Updates on the VI’s athletes at Rio 2016 will be posted on the BVIOC accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram and can be found on these platforms under BVI Olympic Committee.

Chef de Mission for Rio 2016, Stephanie Russ Penn will be traveling to Rio one week in advance of the August 5 Opening Ceremony to prepare for the arrival of the athletes.

In addition to Mrs. Russ Penn, the official delegation to Rio 2016 includes Winston Potter, Athletics Coach, Omar Jones, Athletics Coach, Benoit Grattepanche, Swimming Coach, Tracy Bradshaw, Swimming Chaperone, Matthew McGrath, Physiotherapist, Dr. Harlan Vanterpool, Doctor, Mark Chapman, Olympic Attache, Ephraim Penn, President, BVIOC and Lloyd Black, Secretary General.

BVI Junior Squash players pick up trophies.

By BVI Squash Rackets Association

Junior BVI Squash team competed in the 2016 OECS Junior Squash tournament hosted in the BVI April 15 - 17. Photo: BVISRA

Junior BVI Squash team competed in the 2016 OECS Junior Squash tournament hosted in the BVI April 15 – 17. Photo: BVISRA

Some thrilling Junior squash was played over the weekend at the Tortola Sports Club. Juniors from Tortola battled it out with arch rival players from St. Vincent for OECS (Organization of Eastern Caribbean States) honors and also for prestigious places on the OECS Junior squash team which will head to Cayman in late July for the week-long Caribbean-wide Junior Squash Championships.

Games were fast and furious and provided fans with thrills and spills (literally in some matches) throughout the two day event.

Head coach and previous #10 Men’s Squash Player in the world, Joe Faragher-Kneipp was pleased with the results of BVI’s 12-strong team. He specifically mentioned his rookies, RJ Wong, Tai Thomas, Jake Hallet, Gethin Jones, Stephan Weyers and Lawton Green who played well throughout – “these kids continue to improve and I look forward to seeing them next year during this tournament with a full year of training in hand,” said Joe.

Kirstin Gordon lost a close match that went the full distance to 5 games against Jada Ross of St. Vincent in the U19 Girls Finals. “Her deft drop shot abandoned her in the final. Otherwise it could have just as easily been a 3 game victory sweep for Kirstin,” remarked one young fan.

Brooms were out in the U11 girls category as Darci Reich managed to defend her U11 title against new-comer, Nadira Morgan of St. Vincent in a 3-game sweep. “Her service game was solid and as consistent as a Steph Curry 3 pointer,” remarked one official. “If she was nervous, she did not show it!” Both girls displayed great sportsmanship with smiles throughout the final and, unsurprisingly, it was the St. Vincentian who managed to grab the Sportsmanship award for the tournament – an award that Darci had proudly won in St. Vincent in 2015.

The U11 boys bracket was a close affair also between two Cedar students with 2nd year squash player, Alex Fountain out-pacing Tai Thomas in a tough match that also left supporters talking about a strong future pipeline of squash players.

The U13 boys bracket saw fans torn between fan favorites, Luca Reich (defending champion) and Jasper Forte. The two Cedar boys are both part of the Squash Elective program at Cedar and managed to put on a terrific show for the fans with terrific shot making. Rallies consistently featured electrifying shots and left the fans gasping and cheering on several occasions. Games were close and saw both players displaying early nerves (perhaps as a result of the huge crowd on hand). It was veteran, Luca with steely nerves who managed to squeak out a much deserved win.

Prior to the tournament Luca spoke to sports journalists about Jasper’s continued improvement since last year’s tournament. “He is an up and coming player who will no doubt be a contender for future titles,” remarked Luca. “Without a doubt he is the most improved player in the BVI.”

Tournament officials agreed with his sentiments and awarded Jasper with the ‘Most Improved Squash Player’ award beating out several deserving contenders from both teams. It was Stephan Weyers that would bring home the third place trophy in this tough age group.

Leo Forte brought home a much deserved 3rd place trophy in the U17 boys bracket. His third place showing in the tournament a reflection of the tough competition and high standard of play in that bracket by the St. Vincent team. One of his competitors, Kai Bentick is seeded #2 in the Caribbean and won the U17 bracket.

One fan noted that “It is a function of the fact that Kai focuses his attention mainly on squash while Leo spends considerable time also playing his much loved football”.

Places for the OECS team were not announced at time of this press release. For anyone interested in learning the game of squash please contact Joe Kneipp at the Tortola Sports Club.

Anderson/Brockbank competing in 49er World Championship to qualify for Rio 2016

By The BVI Beacon

Alec Anderson and Chris Brockbank re currently competing in the 49er World Championships in Buenos Aires, Argentina in hopes of qualifying for the 2016 Olympics. Photo: Matías Capizzano

Alec Anderson and Chris Brockbank re currently competing in the 49er World Championships in Buenos Aires, Argentina in hopes of qualifying for the 2016 Olympics. Photo: Matías Capizzano

Alec Anderson and Chris Brockbank are currently competing in the 49er World Championships in Buenos Aires, Argentina in hopes of qualifying for the 2016 Olympics.

The regatta is the second of three chances for the Virgin Islands sailors to qualify for the games. The regatta started on Monday and will wrap up on Saturday.

“Today was very much a learning day,” the sailors posted on Facebook after the first day of the regatta. “Three races, no keepers. Looking to get back on the horse tomorrow! Stay tuned!”

As of Monday, the top three teams are Croatia, Spain and Poland. Messrs. Anderson and Brockbank have been in Buenos Aires for the past three weeks preparing for the event.  They recently competed in the “warm up” event, the 2015 49er South Americans, where they missed qualifying for the Gold Fleet by just two points.

They sat in first in the Silver fleet after two days of racing.  Some of their best performances in the fleet included a fourth-place finish in the fourth race and several top 10 finishes.

“We have done a great job securing some top five races throughout the days leading up to Worlds, we need to limit our bad races to ones that we can keep the score, this will help us in achieving our best result yet at the 2015 Worlds,” Mr. Anderson said.

According to the sailors, the venue has been a difficult place to sail, with shallow brown water, very shifty conditions and steep choppy waves.

The World Championships feature 30 countries competing for just three Olympic qualifying spots. The sailors are some of the best competitors from around the world, including recently crowned International Sailing World Male Sailors of the Year: Blaire Tuke and Peter Burling from New Zealand. The duo took silver at the 2012 London Olympics.

After the World Championships, Messrs. Anderson and Brockbank will be back in the VI for three weeks to train before they head to Miami for the World Cup. This event will be the last chance for the sailors to qualify for the Olympics.

To follow the sailors’ progress, go to www.49er.org or visit Anderson/Brockbank Sailing on Facebook.

Youth Sailors compete in St Thomas, Bermuda

Bermuda Junior Gold Cup. Photo: Provided

Bermuda Junior Gold Cup. Photo: Provided

The BVI was well represented with eight youth sailors competing in the St. Thomas Columbus Day Regatta on October 10-11. The regatta hosted 13 Optimist Green Fleet racers, 13 Optimist Championship racers, and 5 Club 420 teams.

Saturday conditions were 12-15 knots of breeze with large waves on the Club 420 and Championship course by Cow and Calves rocks. Sunday conditions calmed down when the racing area moved to Pillsbury Sound. The Optimist Green Fleet raced in Cowpet Bay both days.

BVI Green Fleet Optimist sailors included Nicolas Haycraft, Scott Kirk, and Noah George.

Noah George’s best race was an impressive 4th place finish and a respectable 8th place overall. Nicolas Haycraft’s first row starts led to consistent finishes and landed him in the 5th place spot overall.

Ryan Lettsome, Kyle Roose, and Anya and Max Reshetiloff competed for team BVI in the Optimist Championship fleet.

Max Reshetiloff finished 9th overall with a couple of great starts. With his steadfast perseverance in his first ever championship fleet event, Ryan Lettsome took home the 2nd place white fleet trophy.

The top Championship Optimist sailor from team BVI was Kyle Roose. With his regular finishes in the top half of the fleet, along with taking a 2nd place in his best race, Kyle finished 6th overall and took home the 2nd place trophy for Optimist Blue Fleet.
The Club 420 racing was tight all weekend. After missing the first two races Saturday, BVI sailor Sam Morrell and his crew, Hanna Clemens sailed very well the rest of the weekend. Morrell and his crew finished 2nd overall, just a few points behind the 1st place finisher Teddy Nicolosi and his crew, Amanda Engeman from St. Thomas.

Also racing over the weekend was BVI sailor, Rayne Duff who competed in the Bermuda Junior Gold Cup form October 8 – 11. The regatta was an invite-only, usually offered to sailors who have placed well in their categories over the last year.

During the regatta the conditions varied from extremely light to medium winds. On the first day Rayne had good results, first race with a first, keeping him at the top of the fleet. During the next couple of days Rayne’s status stayed at the top of the fleet, and was able to discard his last race (a 23rd). Rayne ended up in 4th place out of 45 competitors which, according to the Royal BVI Yacht Club, is to be considered a great result for a first regatta of this calibre.